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Reblogged from skunkbear

skunkbear:

The blooming of an Amorphophallus titanum (AKA corpse flower AKA titan arum) at The Huntington Library last week inspired me!

If you think humans jump through a lot of hoops just to reproduce, check out this plant. It waits 7-10 years, storing up starch in a giant tuber, just so it can bloom for a single day. Then it pretends to be a hunk of rotting meat to attract insect pollinators. Then, months later, it switches tactics to a produce a sweet fruit so birds will disperse it’s seeds.

If you have never smelled a titan arum but for some odd reason you would like to … you are in … luck? Scientists have identified the exact malodorous chemicals that come off these strange flowers to attract pollinators - so you can create the scent at home!*

*please, for your own sake, don’t try this at home.

(via brilliantbotany)

Reblogged from america-wakiewakie

nezua:

nedahoyin:

america-wakiewakie:

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.

Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.

Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.

The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.

(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)

WELP..

Indigenous resistance.

(via ephemeralquiet)

Reblogged from tabletopwhale

tabletopwhale:

This week I made an animated chart of butterflies! These are all butterflies that you can find throughout North America, and I picked the 42 that I thought were the most colorful and unique. 

You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

Reblogged from florafaunagifs

bogleech:

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

The constant wobbling as they move is a part of their disguise, making it seem as though the “leaf” is only moving because of a light breeze.

If you blow on one it will also shake around in the hopes of matching any actual surrounding leaves

(via lizardtakesflight)

Reblogged from iguanamouth

thegreenwolf:

iguanamouth:

alternatively, heres a bunch of peacock spiders dancing to ymca

OH. MY. GAWD.

(via carpecanem)

Reblogged from libutron

libutron:

Nomia iridescens a Bee with colourful abdominal stripes 

This cool bee, scientifically named Nomia iridescens, belongs to the Halictidae Family, a cosmopolitan group commonly referred to as halictid bees and sweat bees.

Nomia iridescens is a conspicuously banded bee with amazing neon-green stripes, which occurs in southeast Asia (India, Borneo, Peninsular malaysia, Philippines).

Sweat bees, play a vital role in the pollination ecology of a region. By having  a wide range of adaptational capabilities, these inhabit all kind of ecological niches both in tropical and temperate regions. In number and kind these anthophilic insects (attracted to flowers) surpass all other bees and thus are mainly responsible for conserving the vegetation germplasm by pollinating a bewildering variety of wild and cultivated entomophilic flora.

References: [1] - [2] - [3] - [4]

Photo credit: ©Paul Bertner | Locality: Mt. Isarog National Park, Philippines (2014) | [Top] - [Middle] - [Bottom]

Reblogged from adorablespiders

adorablespiders:

i hate that when i tell people i love spiders they start telling me about the times when they’ve killed a spider or spiders and it’s like why are you telling me this you’re basically admitting to drowning a bag of kittens to me, that is the equivalent. 

stop bragging about killing innocent animals no matter how small or “scary”

Reblogged from archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

Today we join the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders in astonishment at the golden mesh marvel that is the cocoon of the Urodidae moth. Also known as “false burnet moths,” these small to medium sized moths spend their pupal stage in unusual and incredibly beautiful open-mesh cocoons, which are sometimes suspended on a very long thread below a leaf.

"This type of cocoon is known as a "open-network cocoon" and is unlike other cocoons in that it doesn’t completely enclose the pupa in silk. Instead, it only partially surrounds it, likely enabling better airflow to control for humidity and may help prevent fungi from growing on, and eventually killing, the pupa. This cocoon very likely belongs to a moth in the family Urodidae, which is known for making this type of lattice-structured cocoon surrounding its pupa."

Click here to watch a video about these amazing structures.

Photos by Jeff Cremer, click here to view more.

[via Reddit, formakers and Smarter Every Day]

(via rcgott)

Reblogged from c-dra
c-dra:

Since I’m moving out of my apartment soon and I’m trying to pack as little as I can, I need to get rid of most of my old paintings and art stuff.  So out of curiosity, would anyone be interested in this watercolor painting? It’s 30x22in so it’s pretty big, but I can roll it up and mail it anywhere in the US. I’m not sure how to price it, so if you’re interested, just inbox me an offer and we can work something out!

c-dra:

Since I’m moving out of my apartment soon and I’m trying to pack as little as I can, I need to get rid of most of my old paintings and art stuff.  So out of curiosity, would anyone be interested in this watercolor painting? It’s 30x22in so it’s pretty big, but I can roll it up and mail it anywhere in the US. I’m not sure how to price it, so if you’re interested, just inbox me an offer and we can work something out!

Reblogged from mynameismad

mynameismad:

I COLORED THE MILLIPEDE. You can buy this as a print at Otakon! I’ll be at table K-06 in the artist alley (I’ll make a big post about it later tonight.) 

(via greenstarz)