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Reblogged from astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)

…is a species of “Hummingbird” Sphinx Moth (Sphingidae) which is widely distributed throughout North America. Adult snowberry clearwings are often seen in flowery fields during the day where they will feed, like the hummingbirds they are named after, on nectar from flowers. Snowberry clearwings are typically seen flying from March to September, however this season can be shorter the north north they occur. Snowberry clearwings will have two generations per year. With caterpillars feeding on dogbane, honeysuckle, and of course snowberry. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Bombycoidea-Sphingidae-Macroglossinae-Dilophonotini-Hemaris-H. diffinis

Images: Cody Hough and Lonnie Huffman

Reblogged from adorablespiders
adorablespiders:

Female jumping spider Portia sp. with her spiderlings
image source

adorablespiders:

Female jumping spider Portia sp. with her spiderlings

image source

Reblogged from as-grand-asthe-avenue
Reblogged from astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Metallyticus splendidus
…is an extraordinary species of Metallyticid mantis which is spread throughout Southeast Asia. M. splendidus is most well noted for its striking iridescent rainbow coloration and short body, these features are present because M .splendidus is a mimic of the colorful tiger beetles (Cicindelinae).
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Mantodea-Metallyticidae-Metallyticus-M, splendidus
Image: Notafly

astronomy-to-zoology:

Metallyticus splendidus

…is an extraordinary species of Metallyticid mantis which is spread throughout Southeast Asia. M. splendidus is most well noted for its striking iridescent rainbow coloration and short body, these features are present because M .splendidus is a mimic of the colorful tiger beetles (Cicindelinae).

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Mantodea-Metallyticidae-Metallyticus-M, splendidus

Image: Notafly

Reblogged from libutron
libutron:

Semioptila fulveolans, Sakania, DRC by Nigel Voaden
Lepidoptera - Himantopteridae. Democratic Republic of Congo.

libutron:

Semioptila fulveolans, Sakania, DRC by Nigel Voaden

Lepidoptera - Himantopteridae.
Democratic Republic of Congo.

(via lizardtakesflight)

Reblogged from lindahall

lindahall:

Franz Kafka - (Honorary) Scientist of the Day

Franz Kafka, a Jewish Bohemian writer, was born July 3, 1883. Kafka doesn’t make it into most history of science surveys, which is too bad, because he wrote one of the great entomological short stories of all time, “Die Verwandlung” (“The Metamorphosis”, published in 1915). As everyone knows, even those who have never read the story, Gregor Samsa awakens in the first sentence to find that he has been transformed into a gigantic insect. Actually, the term that Kafka uses for the end product of Gregor’s metamorphosis is an Ungeziefer, which means “an unclean animal unsuitable for sacrifice,” or, colloquially, a “bug.” Critics have had a field day adjudicating exactly what kind of bug awoke in Samsa’s bed; they have pretty well rejected “cockroach”, and “dung beetle,” but since Kafka was deliberately obscure on the matter, it is hard to say. All we know for sure is that Gregor was roundish, with tiny legs, and mandibles strong enough to open a door. 

So on this vital matter, we will side with Vladimir Nabokov, not only a great writer himself, but an avid bug collector as well, and in a lecture he regularly gave at Cornell (he was on the faculty there from 1948-58), Nabokov argued for Gregor’s having been transformed into a beetle. You can read Nabokov’s lecture here if you would like (you may skip over the first part, on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), but it is much more fun, if you have 30 minutes to spare later tonight, to watch Christopher Plummer re-enact an abridged version of Nabokov’s lecture, a performance that was recorded in 1989 before a willing student retro-audience at Cornell. It is quite a riveting performance. Sometimes I think we teachers should just retire and turn the classroom over to stage actors—they really do a much better job. We may think we know more than they do, but who can tell, when they have a great script, and possess stage skills that push us back deep into the wings.

The beetle image above, one of the loveliest renditions of a beetle ever made, is from Edward Donovan’s Natural History of the Insects of India (1800). We see also the title page to the first printing of Metamorphosis, and a bizarre monument to Kafka—one might well call it Kafkaesque—that you may find in Prague.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via heaveninawildflower)

Reblogged from adorablespiders
adorablespiders:

Metallic Blue Jumping Spider
image source

adorablespiders:

Metallic Blue Jumping Spider

image source

(via doctorbuggs)

Reblogged from astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Golden-backed Snipe Fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus)
…a species of snipe fly (Rhagionidae) that is distributed throughout eastern North America. Adult C. thoracicus typically inhabit Deciduous woodlands and are active during spring, April through May.  Adults are thought to be predatory on other insects, but they may not feed often.
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Diptera-Orthorrhapha-Tabanomorpha-Rhagionidae-Chrysopilus-C. thoracicus
Image: ©Mike Burchett

astronomy-to-zoology:

Golden-backed Snipe Fly (Chrysopilus thoracicus)

…a species of snipe fly (Rhagionidae) that is distributed throughout eastern North America. Adult C. thoracicus typically inhabit Deciduous woodlands and are active during spring, April through May.  Adults are thought to be predatory on other insects, but they may not feed often.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Diptera-Orthorrhapha-Tabanomorpha-Rhagionidae-Chrysopilus-C. thoracicus

Image: ©Mike Burchett

Reblogged from buggirl

buggirl:

Shield Mantis photo shoot.

Maquipucuna, Ecuador

Reblogged from awwww-cute

(Source: awwww-cute, via candypinkcocks)